All posts by Ken Billings

This web site was founded in 2014 by Dr. Shiv Chopra and Marilyn Cosway and called, The Canadian Council on Food Sovereignty & Health. In 2017, the name was changed to Canadian Council on Food Safety and Health. On Sept 7th, 2017, after 14 years in the Federal courts, and over $10 million dollars spent by the Federal government, Dr. Shiv Chopra was found guilty by 3 judges of 'Insubordination' for speaking out on food safety. Three months later, on Jan 7th, 2018, Dr. Shiv Chopra died. CCFSH honours Whistleblower Dr. Shiv Chopra and his tireless efforts to make Health Canada more accountable and educate Canadians on how Canadians can have the healthiest food in the world if we adhere to the Five Pillars of Food Safety. Join the movement in honouring whistleblower Dr. Shiv Chopra and help these goals to come through by sharing our web site and getting involved by signing up for 'FOOD Justice NEWS' or one of our 3 Activism Groups called 'Shivista Collectives'. Thank you. Ken Billings Executive Director

Solutions: Building Communities (Corbett Report) 39 min

People are isolated from each other, public spaces are being privatized, and we are being punished for attempting to grow our own food. There is only one solution: resistance. Join James for this classic Corbett Report episode where he explores how to build communities through revolutionary gardening, revolutionary walking and other everyday activities.

Why you should add a little Swedish lagom to your life

It has to do with moderation, but it’s so much more than that.

Last year was one of extremes — weather, politics, news and for me, home environments. (I moved from incredibly dry California to verdant and perpetually damp western Washington state.) So I could do with a bit of moderation in the coming year. Which is why I’ve found the Swedish concept of lagom so appealing — and others have too. (With no fewer than eight books on the subject, it’s clear this is a trend.)

To learn more about it, I spoke with lagom expert Anna Brones, an author whose recently published book, “Live Lagom: Balanced Living, the Swedish Way,” serves as a guide to this way of thinking. Some say lagom translates to the English word “moderation,” but it’s a little more holistic than that, much in the same way hygge means much more than “cozy”.

The simplest definition of the term, according to Brones’ book, is “… just right. Not too much, not too little,” and it’s “… a thread that ties many parts of Swedish society together, the cornerstone of personal behavior, design ethos, and community.” She explains that in more detail in the video below:

Lagom:Just enough (2 min)

Article

Documentary: ‘Call Of The Forest – The Forgotten Wisdom Of Trees’

The science and enchantment of the global forest provides us with answers to modern dilemmas.

‘Call Of The Forest – The Forgotten Wisdom Of Trees’ is a documentary featuring scientist and acclaimed author Diana Beresford-Kroeger. The film follows Diana as she investigates our profound biological and spiritual connection to forests. Her global journey explores the science, folklore, and restoration challenges of this essential eco-system.

Beresford-Kroeger explores the most beautiful forests in the Northern Hemisphere from the sacred sugi and cedar forests of Japan to the great boreal forest of Canada. She shares the amazing stories behind the history and legacy of these ancient forests while also explaining the science of trees and the irreplaceable roles they play in protecting and feeding the planet.

Along the way we meet some of the world’s foremost experts in reforestation.

Website: Call of the Forest

Video Trailer for ‘Call of the Forest’ (2 min)

About Diana

America’s first urban ‘agrihood’ feeds 2,000 households for free

When you think of Detroit, ‘sustainable‘ and ‘agriculture‘ may not be the first two words that you think of. But a new urban agrihood debuted by The Michigan Urban Farming Initiative (MUFI) might change your mind. The three-acre development boasts a two-acre garden, a fruit orchard with 200 trees, and a sensory garden for kids.

America’s first urban ‘agrihood’

Seeds of Life: A Quiet Revolution is Underway at the Foothills of Niyamgiri, India (14 min)

With help of local organisations, the Panga Kodhs have gone back to traditional, organic, mixed cropping methods. Even the forests are benefiting.

“I’m born of this soil. Putting poison in the soil is like poisoning one’s parents. Why would I harm myself like this?”, says Adi Kumurka. Kumurka belongs to the Panga Kondh indigenous community in Odisha’s Rayagada district. His community is engaged in mixed organic cropping from traditional seeds. This is the traditional way of farming that his community has practised since untold times. But there was a long gap in between when malnourishment and farmer suicides compelled these traditional farmers to migrate to faraway places to look for jobs. What changed?

Article: Seeds of Life: A Quiet Revolution

Video: Seeds of Life (14 min)

Biomimicry: What Would Nature Do Here? January 16th, 2018

If nonhuman nature could speak with a human voice, she’d sound a lot like Janine Benyus. Of course, human beings are a part of nature, not apart from it, and that has long been Janine’s most essential message. Her work as an ardent naturalist eventually led her to get under nature’s skin sufficiently to ask what is perhaps the most basic question people need to address to live sustainably on the land: What would nature do here? That deceptively simple query resulted in her momentous exploration of an emerging revolutionary approach to science and design chronicled in her landmark book, Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature.

Janine is an educator and life sciences writer who has degrees in forestry, natural resource management, and English literature. She combines a deep appreciation of science with an abiding love of the natural world. And she is no armchair naturalist: she has written three great regional field guides and a sly animal behavior guide, Beastly Behaviors. She’s been a backpacking guide and is active in protecting wildlands in her home state of Montana.

In the following excerpt from Nature’s Operating Instructions (Sierra Club Books, 2004), Benyus writes about why humans should learn from nature rather than merely about it—taking cues from complex systems that have developed over millions of years and applying these lessons to manmade systems.

Watch a video of Janine Benyus’ 2016 Bioneers keynote at the bottom of this article.

Article – Biomimicry: What Would Nature Do Here?

Video – Janine Benyus: Biomimicry as a Cooperative Inquiry – Bioneers 2016 (32 min)