Tag Archives: WHO

How what you eat directly influences your mental health

New Scientist – Sept 4, 2019 – Scott Anderson

Peter Strain

REMEMBER the last time you had a stomach bug and just wanted to crawl into bed and pull up the covers? That is called “sickness behaviour” and it is a kind of short-term depression. The bacteria infecting you aren’t just making you feel nauseous, they are controlling your mood too. It sounds absurd: they are in your gut and your feelings are generated in your brain. In fact, this is just an inkling of the power that microbes have over our emotions.

In recent years, such organisms in the gut have been implicated in a range of conditions that affect mood, especially depression and anxiety. The good news is that bacteria don’t just make you feel low; the right ones can also improve your mood. That has an intriguing implication: one day we may be able to manipulate the microbes living within our gut to change our mood and feelings.

It is early days, but the promise is astounding. The World Health Organization rates depression and anxiety as the number one cause of disability, affecting at least 300 million people worldwide. The new findings challenge the whole paradigm of mental illness being caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, and offer an alternative to drug treatment. You’ve probably heard of probiotics, but these are their new incarnation – psychobiotics. They could be about to change the mood of the planet.

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Styrene, a common ingredient in many plastic items, now deemed to be “probably carcinogenic” by WHO

Natural News – Aug 23, 2018

The World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has now upgraded the cancer-causing status of the common plastic ingredient styrene. The move came in response to the results of a comprehensive study carried out by researchers from Aarhus University, along with new animal evidence.

More than 70,000 people were included in the register-based research. The scientists looked at the incidence of acute myeloid leukemia, which is a rare form of leukemia that has been associated with styrene exposure. In a population of this size, the researchers would statistically expect 10 patients to have the disease. Instead, they found 25 cases of the illness, leading them to conclude that the ingredient is even riskier than once believed.

They also found a fivefold higher risk for a specific type of nasal cancer among those who have been exposed to styrene.

In response, the IARC has upgraded styrene from being “possibly carcinogenic” to being “probably carcinogenic” to humans. The announcement will be published as a monograph – a special type of impartial research report that countries can use as a basis for legislation – written by 23 researchers from all over the world. These researchers reviewed and reevaluated the chemical’s risk in light of the latest research on exposure to styrene, including human epidemiological studies, mechanism studies, and experiments with animals.

You can find styrene in synthetic rubber, disposable tableware, fiberglass plastic, Styrofoam and some other types of packaging, and insulation materials.

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Republicans Back Monsanto, Threaten to Cut WHO’s Funding Which Calls Glysophate ‘Carcinogenic’

Right-wing lawmakers and industry makers targeted the IARC for its research in 2015 that linked glyphosate to possible cancer in humans.

Some Republican lawmakers have bashed the International Agency for Research on Cancer, IARC, a World Health Organization, WHO, agency and threatened to cut its funding over for calling a widely used herbicide chemical, glyphosate as a possible “carcinogenic” at a House Science Committee hearing.

Right-wing lawmakers and industry makers targeted the IARC for its research in 2015 that linked glyphosate to possible cancer in humans.

On Tuesday, a Republican representative from Texas, Lamar Smith, said the health regulating agency’s claims were “unsubstantiated” and “not backed by reliable data.”

“The selective use of data and the lack of public disclosure raise questions about why IARC should receive any government funding in the future,” Smith said.

WHO is defending its stance based on years-long research.

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