Category Archives: Organic Farming

Canadian organic growers Seed Directory

COG – May 4, 2020

Suppliers

DeDell Seeds

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.dedellseeds.com
Contact email info@dedellseeds.com
Contact phone number519-264-2676
Supplier Location7079 Century Drive Melbourne, Ontario N0L1T0
 Supplier DescriptionDe Dell Seeds is proud to be a family owned and operated seed corn company, specializing in Non-GMO and Organic seed corn.

Golden Acres Farm

Contact emailgoldenacresfarm@hotmail.com
Contact phone number519-656-3152
Supplier LocationGadshill, Ontario, Canada
Ordering instructions/detailsContact us
Supplier DescriptionWe sell our seed garlic at the Stratford Garlic Festival, the Toronto Garlic Festival, mail orders and farm gate. Contact us for our descriptive catalog in PDF and to ask any questions. Buckwheat is sold mainly as a cover crop for farmers and gardeners. Pick up at our farm or possible delivery.

Greta’s Organic Gardens

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.seeds-organic.com
Contact emailgreta@seeds-organic.com
Contact phone number613-521-8648
Supplier LocationOttawa, Ontario

Hawthorn Farm

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.hawthornfarm.ca
Contact emailsales@hawthornfarm.ca
Contact phone number519-343-3375
Supplier LocationPalmerston, ON
Ordering instructions/detailsonline, mail, email, phone
Supplier DescriptionHawthorn Farm is a family owned Canadian company dedicated to producing high quality, open pollinated certified organic seed.

High Mowing Organic Seeds

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.highmowingseeds.com/
Contact emailquestions@highmowingseeds.com
Contact phone number802-472-6174
Supplier LocationWolcott, VT
Ordering instructions/detailsPlease feel free to place an order on our website, by calling one of our friendly sales representatives, or by mailing in our order form from our catalog.
Supplier DescriptionHigh Mowing Organic Seeds is an independently-owned, farm-based seed company dedicated to supporting sustainable agriculture and providing farmers and gardeners with the highest quality certified organic seed.

Hope Seeds

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.hopeseed.com/
Contact emailhopeseed@eastlink.ca
Contact phone number902-286-4673
Supplier LocationAnnapolis Royal, NS Canada
Ordering instructions/details
Supplier DescriptionHope Seeds is a small but committed seed company, with a dedication to local and sustainable agriculture since our beginning in 1993. We offer certified organic and sustainably-grown, heritage and open-pollinated garden seed.  We’re committed to high quality, organic growing, and local food.

Norseco

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.dominion-seed-house.com
Contact emailmail@dominion-seed-house.com
Contact phone number1-800-784-3037
Supplier LocationCanada
Ordering instructions/detailsPhone: 1-800-784-3037 Fax: 1-800-282-5746 Internet: mail@dominion-seed-house.com Mail: Dominion Seed House P.O. Box 2500 Georgetown (Ontario) L7G 5L6
Supplier DescriptionFounded in 1928 in Montreal, initially under the name W.H. Perron, NORSECO is today one of the most important distributors of vegetable and flower seeds, as well as horticultural products, in Canada. Dominion Seed House takes care of all the needs of home gardeners for flower and vegetable seed as well as for gardening tools trough its mail and Internet catalogues. Our organic vegetable seed line is available since 2005.

Ontario Seed Company (OSC)

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.oscseeds.com
Contact emailseeds@oscseeds.com
Contact phone number(519) 886-0557
Supplier LocationWaterloo, Ontario
Ordering instructions/detailsPlease order using our secure website or give us a call.
Supplier DescriptionOntario Seed Co., Limited is a family owned, Canadian seed processor. We have sold seed and gardening products for over 120 years.

Organic Meadow

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.organicmeadow.com
Contact emailking@organicmeadow.com
Contact phone number519-767-9694 x 430
Supplier LocationGuelph
Ordering instructions/details
Supplier DescriptionOrganic Meadow is a farmer owned cooperative serving organic farmers throughout Ontario. We have a full line of organic field crop seed.

Osborne Seed

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.osborneseed.com
Contact emaildave@osborneseed.com, jules@osborneseed.com
Contact phone number604-518-6953
Supplier Location2428 Old Hwy 99 South Road, Mount Vernon, WA 98273
Ordering instructions/detailsCheck out our online store at the link above. You can also request a catalog and order over the phone – 360-424-SEED (7333).
Supplier DescriptionOsborne Seed Company is celebrating our 30th year of serving the agricultural community! Catering to the needs of our growers is what drives our whole business; impacting how we source seed, do variety trials, share resources and information, and provide customer service. Give us a call, we may be the wealth of information you need! If you want more info, check out our trial blog: http://vegtrials.blogspot.com

ProRich Seeds

Contact emaildeb_prorich@hotmail.com
Contact phone number1-800-361-1593
Supplier LocationMount Elgin, Ontario

RDR

Supplier Homepagehttp://semencesrdr.com/

Speare Seeds

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.speareseeds.ca
Contact emailinfo@speareseeds.ca
Contact phone number519-338-3840
Supplier LocationHarriston, Ontario, Canada

Terra Edibles

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.terraedibles.ca
Contact emailkaryn@terraedibles.ca
Contact phone number613-961-0654
Supplier LocationFoxboro, Ontario
Ordering instructions/detailsOrder by mail, phone or on our secure website. Payment by credit card or cheque.
Supplier DescriptionIn business since 1992, Terra Edibles offers organically-grown (many certified organic), open pollinated seeds for heirloom tomatoes, vegetables, herbs and flowers.

TourneSol Co-operative Farm

Supplier Homepagewww.fermetournesol.qc.ca
Contact emailsemences@fermetournesol.qc.ca
Contact phone number416.504.1653
Supplier Location1025 ch. St.Dominique, Les Cedres, Quebec

Urban Harvest

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.uharvest.ca
Contact emailgrow@uharvest.ca
Contact phone number416.504.1653
Supplier LocationToronto, ON, Canada
Ordering instructions/detailsOrder through our on-line store, or down-line an order form from our web site and fax it to 416.504.7426. Or give us a call and we will happily take your order in person.
Supplier DescriptionUrban Harvest Organic Seeds was founded in 1997 to supply heirloom vegetable seedlings to urban gardeners. In 1999 we added 25 varieties of heirloom seeds. Since then we have expanded to over 380 varieties. We grow some of our seed ourselves in Schomberg, ON and in our greenhouses. We also contract several farms to grow seed for us. Our mission has always been to grow the highest quality open-pollinated organic seed in order to protect our food diversity.

Veseys

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.veseys.com
Contact phone number1-800-363-7333

West Coast Seeds Ltd.

Supplier Homepage https://www.westcoastseeds.com/

Contact email

customerservice@westcoastseeds.com

Contact phone number  604.952.8820 or 1888.804.8820

Supplier Location    Delta, British Columbia

Ordering instructions/details  Order on-line 24/7, phone (open 7 days a week Jan 15 – May 15 each year) or fax 604.952.8828

Supplier Description West Coast Seeds established in 1983, with over 1,100 varieties of veggies, herbs, fruit, flowers, as well as microgreens, sprouts and new for 2019 Certified Organic cover crops. Canadian family owned with a passion to help farms and gardeners grow 12 months a year.

William Dam Seeds

Supplier Homepagehttp://www.damseeds.com
Contact emailinfo@damseeds.com
Contact phone number905-628-6641
Supplier LocationDundas, Ontario
Ordering instructions/detailson-line store, by mail/fax/phone, or visit our retail location. See website for directions.
Supplier Descriptiona family owned importer of vegetable, herb, and flower seeds. Emphasis on professional quality seeds; better strains for market and home gardens.

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COG Seed Directory

Coronavirus Will Lead to a Rennissance for Decentralization, Permaculture, and Mutual Aid – video – 48 min

The Conscious Resistance – Apr 25, 2020 – Video 48 min

VIDEO SOURCE

In this video John Bush talks about the opportunity we have to further the philosophies and strategies of decentralization, permaculture, and mutual aid. He will discuss the failures of a centralized economies, food production systems, and social organizations and will present a more viable alternative. An alternative we can all play a role in bringing to fruition. “You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” – Buckminster Fuller

Get masks, hand sanitizer, colloidal silver, and immune boosting herbs, vitamins, and minerals here – https://bravehealthstore.com/?ref=1 (A portion of your purchase goes to support the Conscious Resistance Network!)

Sign up for the Live Free Now newsletter – http://bit.ly/2VQOyLR

“We don’t want to be activists” – African organic expert’s message to Biofach audience

Natural Products – Feb 20, 2020 – Jim Manson

Dr. David M. Amudavi, executive director of the Nairobi, Kenya-headquartered Biovision Africa Trust, told a session on global trends in organic that while conventional agriculture remained the major focus across the continent, more interest was now being shown in organic. 

“The space for organic has historically been limited, but research has demonstrated very effectively that organic farming can contribute to increased yields and lower cost of inputs of production,” Amudavi said. He added that “important new initiatives|” were also demonstrating organic “important contribution to climate change mitigation”.

Amudavi said that the amount of organic farming in Africa remains modest. Organic land in the 10 countries on the continent with the highest amount of organic farming totals around 2 million hectares, world by 789,000 producers (with Tunisia, Tanzania, Uganda, Ethiopia and Keyna taking the top five positions). 

Amudavi says the that more research and improved data capture is needed. “We need the type of research effort that made the Green Revolution happen. We don’t want to be activists – we want to present the research evidence, the economic argument for organic. If the case is strong and supported by research we are less vulnerable to criticism. We need to get beyond the question that policy-makers so often ask, ‘can organic feed the continent?’.”

SOURCE

ORC at 40: Challenging times for organic, but we can be ‘driving force’

Natural Products – Jan 22nd, 2020 – Jim Manson

As it begins its 40th year, the Organic Research Centre (ORC) – the UK’s leading independent organic research body – has moved to new premises. 

The relocation to Trent Lodge in Cirencester follows a rethink of the charity’s business model since the departure of long-standing CEO Nic Lampkin last year. 

The decision was made to sell the ORC’s previous headquarters, Elm Farm near Newbury, with the aim that proceeds would provide long-term stability, a source of investment income for core funding, and scope to invest in the organisation for the future.

The new premises are situated next to the Royal Agricultural University (RAU), which will help boost the ORC’s industry relations and collaborative activities as well as providing a base for research.

Editorial Note from CCFSH:

Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada – Photo – Ken Billings

Across the country, Agriculture Canada has 20 Research farms. Two in each western province, four in Ontario, four in Quebec and one in each of the Eastern provinces.

According to Agriculture Canada, the jewel in Ottawa, 1150 acres in the middle of the city, called the Central Experimental Farm uses chemicals on 95 to 98 % of the farm.

The people of Canada have a unique opportunity to build a better, healthier business plan. These research facilities, taken over by a volunteer Board of Directors could produce ‘ Organic, Permaculture and Greenhouse Research and Education Centres to provide fiirst class organic research facilities for school children to learn first hand about the wonders of growing safe, healthy food. This is a win/win if we can out maneuver the marriage of Big Agra and the Federal Government control.

This was a big dream of Dr. Shiv Chopra. To do this, it has to be sooner than later. In places like Ottawa, they have already earmarked 70 acres for a hospital and the city developers are drooling over the rest of the Central Experimental Farm.

What do you think?

Ken Billings

Executive Director, CCFSH

‘Food is medicine’ says Boston hospital that has built its own rooftop organic farm

Natural Products – Oct 27, 2019 – Michael Wale

A Boston hospital is growing 7,000 pounds of organic vegetables on its rooftop farm as part of its mission to show that food really is medicine, writes Michael Wale. 

David Maffeo, senior director of support services was one of the people behind the rooftop farm idea at Boston’s Medical Centre (BMC) in Massachusetts; It is known as a ‘safety-net’ hospital because it mainly serves lower income and elderly patients.

He says: “ I was sitting with my boss and we were talking about the Preventative Food Pantry, a scheme where we introduce poorer people to good food for free for a certain time. I said wouldn’t it be great to grow organic food for our own patients, as well as supplying The Pantry. All organic. No pesticides.”  

“I said wouldn’t it be great to grow organic food for our own patients, as well as supplying The Pantry. All organic. No pesticides”

The plan was agreed by the hospital’s Office of Development, and within just a year and a half the first crops were being sown – and soon afterwards harvested. That was 2017. That first year they produced 5,000 pounds (2,600 kilos) of produce. It has since increased to nearly 7000lb. 

The farm was designed and installed by roof top growing specialists in Boston-based green roof design specialist Recover.

Milk crate growing containers
The first challenge was the insufficient strength of the hospital’s existing roof to hold the amount of soil needed for a successful growing programme.

The cost to the rebuild the roof was put at $200,000. To fund this crucial part of the project, the hospital made successful approaches to a local philanthropist, so circumventing normal budgetary constraints. Once finished it provided 7,000 square feet of growing space. The next thing needed were containers in which to grow the food. It was decided that milk crates were the best – and most available for the job. Evens so, 2,400 of them were needed. Maffeo admits: “We lent on one of our partners to provide them!”

The hospital has done extensive work around sustainability. Research has shown that the life expectancy of the roof farm can be up to 40 years. Particular attention is given to reducing greenhouse gases. On the roof farm, each milk crate is watered through a hosepipe system that runs separately through a device into each crate. It is a strictly metered system that is designed stop functioning when it detects local rainfall. 

The hospital is ambitious about expanding the farm, which as well as producing healthy food crops, also places an important role in teaching media staff about food’s role as a medicine. It’s one of the first things students learn about on arrival. 

Changing attitudes to food
Maffeo explains the changing attitudes in America towards food and health: “Food has come a long way in the United States. I’ve worked in a hospital kitchen. Now I only buy fresh fish, locally caught. And I’ll only buy grain-free beef. These are all big changes in our attitude to food, and how it is grown. At the farm here, we grow 25 different types of vegetables and salad produce. Everything from tomatoes to carrots and peppers. There farm also makes honey from beehives, which yield around 150lbs of honey a year. 

Lindsey Allan

Lindsey Allan (pictured) is the farm manager, with the job of planting and organising the whole growing process. She went straight to work on a farm when she left High School, and found that she enjoyed it. She says that she has never had any interest in chemicals-based  farming, and had a background as a keen organic gardener.

Every farm she was involved in over the years was organic, and she is always acutely  aware of climate change. She admits to some initial scepticism about the concept of BMC’s too farm, particularly the because the milk crate containers would not allow development of  a normal root system. 

But she settled on compost based soil, as composting companies found that living soil was important. It was provided by Vermont Compost, which is organic approved. She explains: “We got all the soil up there, already in the milk crates. It took six hours, and we took it to the second floor in the freight lift, and then volunteers took it to the  roof site”.

Demonstrating how tech is is helping to make farming more sustainable, she points out that she controls the watering system from her phone or computer, allowing her switch irrigation on or off remotely. 

As for the actual growing of the food, she says: “Most things grow well. You want a continual harvest, things that are in the ground for as little time as possible – pak-choi would be a good example. I don’t do one time harvest crops, like broccoli, cabbage or potatoes. I have to think what I can get out of every square inch. Some crops work better than others. For example, we found that green beans were labour intensive for us and the kitchen. We grow what the chefs want and they are pretty flexible. We can only provide a small amount of the food they are serving. Salad stuff is the most popular, cherry tomatoes, radishes and so on”. 

World’s healthiest population ambition
She discusses crop choice and planning with the hospital dieticians, who have encouraged her to grow spinach and kale. She says that now that the farm is up and running, she would love another roof, and suggests this could happen in the coming years as everyone is so happy with the results so far.

Because the growing is confined to milk crates it is not surprising to hear that she uses the no till method adding: “You hands are your power tools. No till means using your hands more. Although she says that gardeners are useful to work with, it really does need a farmer to be in control, because you need a volume of production of food, and you have to set targets for this.

For David David Maffeo, BMC’s organic roof farm forms part of wider, bigger ambitions. These, he says, are nothing short of “making Boston the healthiest population in the world”. 

Article SOURCE

DANISH RESEARCHERS ANNOUNCE NEW ORGANIC VERIFICATION TEST

Natural Products – Jim Manson – August 29, 2019

RESEARCHERS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COPENHAGEN SAY THEY HAVE DEVELOPED A NEW ORGANIC FOOD VERIFICATION TEST.

Rather than focusing on the presence of pesticide residues, the new test looks at how organic crops are fertilised, which the Danish researchers say offers a “deeper, more accurate” analysis of whether an organic food label is accurate.

Having an alternative, or complementary, verification test will help maintain confidence in organic at a time when organic fraud has become a significant problem in some parts of the world. 

“Nobody really knows the extent of this type of fraud, but we have seen bad examples from abroad that extend well beyond organic products. Rice made of plastic, wine with toxins, artificial honey, etc. There is not always a health risk associated with food fraud, but it is clear that when you pay a higher price, you expect the product that you are paying for. And, of course, honest producers must be protected,” says assistant professor Kristian Holst Laursen.

“While a major eco-labelling scandal has yet to occur in Denmark, we often forget that our diet is sourced globally, and that our foods are often imported from countries where problems have been documented. For example, in southern Europe, where a large quantity of organic fruits and vegetables are sourced,”

Kristian Holst Laursen’s research group is currently working with the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration and the method is said to be ready for further testing, approval and use by public agencies and commercial interests.

SOURCE