Tag Archives: glyphosate

US EPA Continues Glyphosate Cancer Cover Up with Regulatory Review Publication

Sustainable Pulse – Jan 31, 2020

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has continued its glyphosate cover-up by announcing Thursday that they have finished and published their regulatory review and found that glyphosate is ‘not a carcinogen’.

In a statement released Thursday the agency said; “EPA has concluded that there are no risks of concern to human health when glyphosate is used according to the label and that it is not a carcinogen.”

The EPA’s findings contradict the findings of a working group of 17 experts from 11 countries from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), who in 2015 classified glyphosate as a ‘Probable Human Carcinogen’.

Also in 2015 Sustainable Pulse uncovered a 30 year cover up by Monsanto and the EPA, related to the probable carcinogenicty of glyphosate, the World’s most used herbicide and according to Sustainable Pulse Director, Henry Rowlands, “as expected the cover-up simply continues.”

Rowlands continued “One thing that helps the EPA continue to assist companies such as Bayer/Monsanto to harm public health, is the fact that there are a lack of independent comprehensive studies out there on the harm being caused globally by glyphosate-based herbicides, due to a lack of available funding. This is something that the Global Glyphosate Study is trying to put right.”

Bayer / Monsanto, which produces the glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup, is currently facing more than 75,000 court cases in the U.S., some of which have already proven that Roundup is carcinogenic and specifically that it causes non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Dr. Charles Benbrook, Project Coordinator of the Heartland Study, reacted to the EPA’s announcement; “I am flabbergasted at this decision. There is NOTHING — ZERO — in the EPA decision to reduce worker exposures and risks.

How can the EPA ignore the thousands of comments highlighting the need for EPA to recover its spine and require Bayer/Monsanto and other registrants to take out the high-risk surfactants in glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs), so the GBHs sold in the US are as safe as the reformulated products now sold in Europe?

And why did the EPA not require registrants to add onto labels a requirement for mixer-loaders and applicators to wear gloves, long sleeve pants, chemical-resistant shoes (aka  rubber boots), especially for applicators using hand-held equipment and spraying a GBH for several hours per day, over many days per year, as part of their job, or in keeping up with weeds on their rural property, homestead, or farm?

This irresponsible action by the EPA sets the stage for a concerted campaign by activists and public health advocates to ban all uses of GBHs. For obvious reasons, their prime target won’t be this EPA, and will instead focus on major food companies.”

Food companies are already reacting in the U.S. and elsewhere around the globe by signing up to The Detox Project’s Glyphosate Residue Free certification for their products, which is now one of the fastest growing certifications in North America.

“It is time for consumers to show our industry-supporting government regulators that it really doesn’t matter if they try to hide the truth, we can all make a difference by forcing change at the check-out,” Rowlands concluded.

SOURCE

Glyphosate Contamination in our Food Supply: Safe Food Matters Takes Action in Canada

Sustainable Pulse – Jan 28, 2020 – By Rachel Parent

After Health Canada’s re-approval of the herbicide glyphosate — a probable carcinogen according to the World Health Organization — Safe Food Matters Inc. (SFM), a Toronto based not-for-profit organization concerned about the health impacts of GMO’s and glyphosate, is taking Health Canada to court on January 30, 2020., Rachel Parent wrote on Medium on Monday.

This all follows the infamous court battles in the United States against Bayer/Monsanto over their herbicide Roundup and its links to non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The key ingredient in Roundup also happens to be glyphosate.

While all three court cases against Bayer/Monsanto claiming that roundup caused non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma have been won so far, and with more than 45,000 more cases still waiting on review, countries around the world have started to change their ways.

This has not been the case with the United States or Canada, who have done little to nothing to increase regulations surrounding the herbicide.

In light of Canada’s 2017 re-approval of glyphosate there has been a public outcry for the government to step in. Despite all the evidence, Health Canada, which is subjected to a strong corporate lobby, has done nothing except revise the label. Mary Lou McDonald, President of SFM, says it is “time to legally hold them to account”.

Glyphosate is sprayed on most genetically modified crops (GMOs), including soy, corn, canola and sugar beets. Glyphosate is also sprayed as a pre-harvest desiccant to dry over 70 different crops, including chickpeas, lentils, peas, hops, rye, wheat, and pistachios.

“Canadians spray per capita more glyphosate than the United States does, and I truly believe it will be a health epidemic,” said Brent Wisner, one of the lead attorneys on the Monsanto Trials.

There are numerous scientific studies and a growing body of evidence that shows glyphosate is linked to many health concerns, including cancer, and specifically non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Other growing concerns are allergic reactions, kidney disease, fatty liver disease, mental health concerns, and chronic bowel syndrome. In addition it can mobilize toxic metals, kill bacteria, and recent research confirms that glyphosate alters the “microbiome” — the essential flora in the gut.

Studies provide evidence that these pesticides disrupt the gut bacterial populations (microbiome) at doses assumed safe by regulators. When asking Health Canada about their assessment of safety surrounding the herbicide, and which studies were used for the approval process, they could not provide specifics.

“Canada’s new food guide encourages us to eat more plant-based proteins like lentils, beans and chickpeas, but these are the most contaminated. Spraying crops while they are still growing can speed dry-down (desiccation) for harvest, but glyphosate builds up in the seeds of legumes and cereals, in particular those that are “indeterminate” plants. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirms that maximum residue limits are being exceeded in these foods.” McDonald said in a statement.

After reviewing the scientific evidence and potential negative effects of glyphosate exposure, McDonald felt that she had no other solution but to go to court on this issue. She’s been looking to create a case since 2015, when glyphosate was initially set for re-approval by the Harper government.

In 2017 SFM filed a notice of objection (“NoO”) to the re-registration decision and asked that an independent review panel be established. Eight NoOs were filed in mid-2017, and all were rejected on January 11, 2019. After Health Canada’s statement of rejection, SFM filed an application in federal court, challenging the basis for the rejection of its NoO.

In a final statement, McDonald concluded, “I believe in the law, and think we have a good case. A proper and valid evaluation is current, looks at all available information, follows principles of an evidence-based approach and good scientific practice, and is free from the appearance of conflict of interest. We expect that a new independent panel will ensure the health evaluation of glyphosate meets these criteria.”

Safe Food Matters has been granted a court date of January 30, 2020, at the Federal Court in Toronto: 180 Queen St. W; starting at 9:30. The public is allowed to attend and show their support.

SOURCE

Thailand to Ban Glyphosate and Other High-Profile Pesticides

Sustainable Pulse – Oct 23, 2019

Thailand edged closer Tuesday to banning glyphosate and two other controversial pesticides despite protests from farmers in a multi-billion-dollar agriculture industry aiming to be the “kitchen of the world”.

Source: AFP

Agriculture employs 40 percent of Thailand’s population and the Southeast Asian country is one of the world’s leading rice and sugar exporters.

It is also one of the biggest consumers of pesticides being banned or phased out in other parts of the globe because of links to a variety of illnesses.

Thailand’s National Hazardous Substances Committee voted to ban glyphosate and chemicals paraquat and chlorpyrifos, officials said.

“The ban will be effective on December 1,” committee chair Panuwat Triangjulsri, of the Ministry of Industry, told reporters.

Paraquat, a herbicide which the US Centers for Disease Control calls “highly poisonous”, has been banned in Europe since 2007.

Studies have linked the pesticide chlorpyrifos to developmental delays in children, while critics say the weedkiller glyphosate is a likely cause of cancer.

Glyphosate Box

Glyphosate Residue Free Certification for Food Brands – Click Here

Test Your Food and Water at Home for Glyphosate – Click Here

Test Your Hair for Glyphosate and other Pesticides – Click Here to Find Out Your Long-Term Exposure

Farming organisations and the chemical industry have lobbied for the continued use of glyphosate, sold under the trade name Roundup made by Bayer subsidiary Monsanto.

In the US there are more than 18,000 lawsuits with plaintiffs claiming glyphosate caused different kinds of cancer even though it is widely used in agriculture there.

The company has suffered several defeats in court that it plans to appeal against.

Austria became the first European Union member to forbid all glyphosate use in July, with restrictions also in force in the Czech Republic, Italy and the Netherlands. France is phasing it out by 2023.

19 countries globally now ban glyphosate – find out who they are here

Vietnam banned all herbicides containing glyphosate soon after the Roundup cases in the US, but the decision was swiftly denounced by the US Secretary of Agriculture, who said it would impact global agricultural production.

Thailand’s health minister, who has argued the pesticides put lives at risk, praised Tuesday’s move as “heroic” on his Facebook page even as several dozen farmers protested — citing a rise in production costs.

“If we don’t have the chemicals to eradicate the weeds, we will have to use more labourers,” said Charat Narunchron of a farmers association in Chanthaburi province, who called the ban “unfair”.

Thailand’s Pesticide Alert Network — which has long advocated for the ban — thanked the government but said it needs to help farmers adjust to other methods.

SOURCE

The Brotherhood of Death – Human Guinea Pigs Engdahl Newsletter 12 – FREE Seeds of Destruction Book Sample – Chapter 5

F. William Engdahl – Sept 15, 2019 – Chapter 5

Hello Dear Reader,

In this issue of my periodic newsletter I would like to share with you material that is relevant to my book, Seeds of Destruction: The Hidden Agenda of GMO. The GMO so-called bio-tech industry does incredible things to keep labeling off their products, to prevent independent scientific research in to the safety not only of the genetically modified soybeans or corn or cotton; they also prevent any research into the possible carcinogen traits or toxicity of the agrochemicals they force farmers to use with their GMO seeds. The following is an account of the true origins of the project that is called Genetic Manipulation or creation of unnatural Genetically Manipulated Organisms and the real agenda of the people who sponsor the entire project.

The Brotherhood of Death – Human Guinea Pigs 

It’s 20 pages in A4 format, pdf from SEEDS of DESTRUCTION, Chapter 5

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Germany to Ban Use of Glyphosate from End of 2023

Reuters and Sustainable Pulse – Sept 6, 2019

Germany will ban the use of the weedkiller glyphosate – the subject of billion-dollar U.S lawsuits over claims it causes cancer – from the end of 2023 and limit its use before then, the Environment Ministry said on Wednesday, Reuters reported.

BERLIN (Reuters) – Germany will ban the use of the weedkiller glyphosate – the subject of billion-dollar U.S lawsuits over claims it causes cancer – from the end of 2023 and limit its use before then, the Environment Ministry said on Wednesday.

Germany’s move comes after Austria’s lower house of parliament in July passed a bill banning all uses of glyphosate and after some 20 French mayors last month banned it from their municipalities, defying the government.

Bayer disagreed with Germany’s decision, saying: “Such a ban would ignore the overwhelming scientific assessments of competent authorities around the world that have determined for more than 40 years that glyphosate can be used safely.”

Glyphosate is cleared for use in the European Union until December 2022. Glyphosate-based herbicides are the most commonly applied weed control products in the world.

The German government said it would systematically reduce the use of herbicides containing glyphosate from 2020.

It said there would be a substantial reduction in the quantity of herbicides containing glyphosate being sprayed – due to bans on use in private homes and gardens plus public areas as well as a ban on use before harvests and considerable restrictions on use before sowing and after harvests.

Glyphosate was developed by Monsanto under the brand Roundup. It is now off-patent and marketed worldwide by dozens of other chemical groups including Dow Agrosciences and Germany’s BASF.

Concerns about its safety emerged when a World Health Organization agency concluded in 2015 that it probably causes cancer.

Bayer, which acquired Monsanto last year, says studies and regulators have deemed glyphosate and Roundup safe for human use. The company faces lawsuits over claims the product causes non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Reporting by Andreas Rinke; Writing by Michelle Martin; Editing by Madeline Chamber and Louise HeavensOur Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

SOURCE

Call to Re-think Genetically Engineered Herbicide-Tolerant Crops

CBAN – Aug 22, 2019 – Lucy Sharratt

Proposed Monsanto corn tolerates four herbicides

Ottawa, August 22, 2019. Canadian civil society groups the Canadian Biotechnology Action Network (CBAN) and Prevent Cancer Now (PCN) are calling for a review of the use of genetically engineered (genetically modified or GM) herbicide-tolerant crops in Canada, in response to Monsanto’s request for government approval of a GM corn that can withstand applications of four herbicides, including 2,4-D and dicamba.(1)

“This proposed GM corn demonstrates the breakdown of herbicide-tolerant crops,” said Lucy Sharratt of CBAN. “GM glyphosate-tolerant crops are no longer working due to the spread of glyphosate resistant weeds so companies are replacing them with GM crop plants that are tolerant to other herbicides. This is a short-term fix that will likely recreate the problem and further increase herbicide use. A government review of the impacts of using herbicide-tolerant crops is needed.”

Over twenty years, herbicide-tolerant cropping systems have not reduced herbicide use in Canada as promised. Instead, herbicide sales have gone up and the use of herbicides has led to the development and spread of more herbicide resistant weeds, particularly glyphosate resistant weeds, which are in turn leading to the use of yet more herbicides.

Monsanto’s new proposed corn MON 87429 (now owned by Bayer) is the first GM crop plant to be tolerant to both 2,4-D and dicamba. Most herbicide tolerant crop plants on the market are now tolerant to more than one herbicide. MON 87429 is genetically engineered to tolerate four herbicides: dicamba, 2,4-D, quizalofop, and glufosinate.

“In the escalating weed wars, as herbicide use is increasing the industry is returning to hazardous chlorinated chemicals such as 2,4-D, dicamba and quizalofop,” said Meg Sears, Chair of PCN. “Returning to multiple older herbicide formulations can put farmers and consumers at risk.”

In comments to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, CBAN and PCN call for comprehensive review of the environmental, health and economic impacts of using herbicide-tolerant crops in Canada.

“We need to evaluate the impacts of the whole system, not just assess individual products one by one,” said Sharratt.

Herbicide tolerant crops are designed to survive sprayings of particular pesticide formulations. Approvals of genetically engineered herbicide-tolerant crops since 1995 have led to a predominance of herbicide-tolerant cropping systems in corn, canola, soy and sugarbeet production in Canada. These systems are reliant on patented GM seeds and the accompanying brand-name herbicide formulations. Almost 100% of all the GM crops grown in Canada are genetically engineered to be herbicide-tolerant.

“A national pesticide-reduction strategy is urgently needed, to support biodiverse, resilient ecosystems and help transition to sustainable agriculture in the face of climate change,” said Sears.

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SOURCE